Big Day in European Shark Conservation

Silky Shark (c) 2011 David E GuggenheimBig news in shark conservation from our sister organization, Shark Advocates International: EU Officials Sign UN Migratory Shark Initiative, Propose Stronger Finning Ban

Bergen, Norway. November 21, 2011. The European Union (EU) today became a signatory to the United Nations Convention on Migratory Species (CMS) Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for Sharks, just as the European Commission announced a proposal to strengthen the EU ban on shark “finning” (slicing off a shark’s fins and discarding the body at sea). An EU representative signed the Shark MoU at a ceremony at the 10th Conference of the CMS Parties which opened today in Bergen while the announcement on the finning proposal came from Commission headquarters in Brussels. [Read more...]

Protection for the Ocean Food Chain

A move to protect the menhaden, an essential link in the food chain whose numbers have plummeted over the last half-century, is good news.

Read the full article in the New York Times.

Note: Newswire stories are provided as a courtesy of OceanDoctor.org. Content of these articles is provided by external sources.

Florida divers capture 312 invasive lionfish during derby. (UnderwaterTimes.com)

Florida divers capture 312 invasive lionfish during derby. (UnderwaterTimes.com)

Ocean Today

Note: Newswire stories are provided as a courtesy of OceanDoctor.org. Content of these articles is provided by external sources.

Research supports methane as cause of warming and mass extinctions 56 million years ago. (PhysOrg.com)

Research supports methane as cause of warming and mass extinctions 56 million years ago. (PhysOrg.com)

Ocean Today

Note: Newswire stories are provided as a courtesy of OceanDoctor.org. Content of these articles is provided by external sources.

NOAA and France Partner to Protect Whales

NOAA and France’s Protected Areas Agency have signed a “sister sanctuary” agreement to support the protection of endangered humpback whales that migrate annually more than 3,000 miles between NOAA’s Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary off the Massachusetts coast and Agoa Marine Mammal Sanctuary in the Caribbean’s French Antilles.

NOAA National Marine Sanctuary News

Note: Newswire stories are provided as a courtesy of OceanDoctor.org. Content of these articles is provided by external sources.

Acting Secretary Blank Announces $102 million in Wetlands, Barrier Island Restoration Awards for Louisiana

Acting Secretary of Commerce Rebecca Blank today announced $102 million for three Louisiana projects in the Barataria and Terrebone basins, to restore deteriorated wetlands and barrier island habitats along the state’s coast.

NOAA News Releases

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Snails Traveled on Birds Across Panama Canal, Study Says

Researchers found that at least two snails made the journey from one side of the North American continent to the other in the last million years.

Read the full article in the New York Times…

Note: Newswire stories are provided as a courtesy of OceanDoctor.org. Content of these articles is provided by external sources.

Lionfish Reported at Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary

Lionfish, a venomous invasive marine species considered one of the top predators in many coral reef environments in the Atlantic, have been documented at NOAA’s Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary – the first instance of the invader in the sanctuary since the species spread to U.S. East Coast waters in 2000.

Read the full story at NOAA National Marine Sanctuary News…

Note: Newswire stories are provided as a courtesy of OceanDoctor.org. Content of these articles is provided by external sources.

Penguins Suffer as Antarctic Krill Declines

By Mark Kinver Science and environment reporter, BBC News

The study suggests krill availability affects the population trends of penguins, such as chinstraps

A number of penguin species found in western Antarctica are declining as a result of a fall in the availability of krill, a study has suggested.

Researchers, examining 30 years of data, said chinstrap and Adelie penguin numbers had been falling since 1986.

Warming waters, less sea-ice cover and more whale and seal numbers was cited as reducing the abundance of krill, the main food source for the penguins.

The findings appear in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) is a shrimp-like creature that reach lengths of about 6cm (2in) and is considered to be one of the most abundant species on the planet, being found in densities of up to 30,000 creatures in a cubic-metre of seawater.

It is also one of the key species in the ecosystems in and around Antarctica, as it is the dominant prey of nearly all vertebrates in the region, including chinstrap and Adelie penguins.

Read the rest of the story at BBC.co.uk…

Note: Newswire stories are provided as a courtesy of OceanDoctor.org. Content of these articles is provided by external sources.

Arctic Sea Ice Extent in January Is Lowest in Recorded History (ENN.com)

Arctic sea ice extent in January is lowest in recorded history. (ENN.com)

Ocean Today

Note: Newswire stories are provided as a courtesy of OceanDoctor.org. Content of these articles is provided by external sources.

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